We love the Guardian book season

Last weekend the Guardian and Observer launched their book season with a campaign created by us. And it's just everywhere…. 

On the tube:

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The books don't bend, obviously, it's the panels that do.

Wrapping around the Guardian Review and Observer New Review:

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On the masthead every day:

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It's also on the radio with Bill Nighy and in the paper with many brilliant promotions. This week: a free John leCarre audio download every day, the demand for which gave AudioGo's server a little bit of exercise. Next week: CDs of all your favourite childhood stories and a celebration of Dickens' bicentenary; a bit of advertising for free there.

At the heart of the season is the big Book Swap in which 15,000 books have been released around the country for people to find, read, review and share again. We produced some bookplate stickers to stick in the participating books. If you didn't get yours in the paper you can download one from the website.

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Inside bit.

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Outside bit.

It has, as Ben Terrett would say, 'blown up the twitter'. Plenty of people taking part and tweeting where they've left their books. A sweet one here:

Thanks to whoever left Jane Eyre on the 38 bus. You probably wanted it to go to a sweet young lady, but I'll have to do. #guardianbookswap
And one that complements the work so OBVIOUSLY we'll share it:
Love the guardian books ads, beautifully bright. And I'm getting straight on t'internet to find out about #guardianbookswap

So, get involved at guardian.co.uk/bookswap or #guardianbookswap. Take a picture of your own book swap and post to the flickr page. Lots of people have:
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And finally, it's even been reported on Russian news.

Lots more to come. Buy the Guardian and Observer this weekend (obviously) and for the next few weeks to find out what.

 

Alex loses her hack virginity @(H)activate

(H)activate hack weekend with Nokia produces apps for social change

(H)activate hack weekend with Nokia produces apps for social change

Last week saw the Nokia UK Developer Engagement team put on a hack weekend with Rewired State, our friends at the Guardian and BlueVia (O2 to us UK folks). (H)activate tied into the broader Guardian 'Tech for Social Change' conference, Activate, held on Wednesday.

It was the first time I had fully experienced a full two day hack: 70 developers in a room,  1 task (Develop web and mobile apps to change the world) and under 2 days to deliver. My first learning was you need to come with a fairly developed idea, otherwise you spend the first three hours panicking about what to do and what data there is available. Second learning is when a developer has a red bug on his computer you can't disturb him, he's in the coding zone. Third learning is that sweets and SodaStream keep the geeks coding like mad. Fourth learning is that sleep goes out the window in the quest for a fully functioning prototype – one bloke didn't sleep all weekend, he just hung out all night programming in Kings Cross station. 

So were the hacks any good after just 36 hours work? Yes, I was massively impressed with the 18 hacks, most of which were functioning and not just concepts. The overall winner was SafeTrip, a web & SMS solution aimed at human trafficking. The Nokia prize went to Interact(Your Opinon Matters), a great SMS voting framework that can be used for government polling (think the Census or a referendum) and just as easily for TV voting on X Factor style quizes. If you want to check out all the hacks pop over to the Rewired State blog.

 

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TouchyPeely App: Uniting veggie detritus with hungry compost heaps to reduce waste & produce soil

Hactivate Twitter paper

(H)activate newspaper of all the hackers courtesy of Newspaper Club

 

PS Alex Rogers has asked me to point out she has nothing to do with this post. Twas written by Alex Franklin.

 

the hard sell: Cravendale

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The Guardian's 'Hard Sell' takes on our Cravendale campaign. I think they like it. But I'm not sure.

Traditionally, adverts are meant to make you want to buy the product they're advertising. They're supposed to be aspirational, or funny, or memorable, or just feature a long, drawn-out romance between a couple that couldn't have kept their love alive or overcome the bumps in the romance road without the help of a company that offers both telephone and internet services. But not since the 90s, when alcopop Metz introduced the dream-haunting Judderman (don't YouTube it before bed) has a TV advert made me feel so uncomfortable as the Cravendale Cats With Thumbs.

The 41 seconds of terror begin deceptively quietly, when the question is posed: "Why do cats always stare when you're pouring milk"? Apparently it's because they're plotting. They know it's only a matter of time until they grow thumbs (the crunchy squelchy sound of a sprouting cat thumb will haunt you at 4.35am, when you wake up sweating and shaking as your own moggy scratches at the door). Cravendale wants us to know that when cats have opposable digits, they'll be reading books (on WAR – SIGNIFICANT!!!), sewing, and forming 1960s West Side Story-style gangs, only with worse singing voices. Cats can already see things we can't; what makes you think forming an army to reclaim the world's milk isn't the next step? The irony, of course, is that adult cats are lactose intolerant and shouldn't drink milk. Which means that any act of war over dairy products is just spiteful. The ad closes with the futile words "Jog on, kitty." But it's no use. It's a stark warning of a worrying future when felines rule the planet and humans are left with the worst thing of all: soy milk.

The Guardian and Observer Film Season: name the films challenge

As part of Wieden + Kennedy’s campaign to support The Guardian’s film season we’ve created this short film. It contains references to 26 different movies.

As part of Wieden + Kennedy’s campaign to support The Guardian’s film season we’ve created this short film. It contains references to 26 different movies.

The Guardian and Observer Film Season is, as you might have guessed, all about movies: how they're made, which are the best, who decides which ones you get to see, and what's the latest film news.

But it's also about naming 26 films in 85 seconds.

As part of Wieden + Kennedy's campaign to support The Guardian's film season we've created the short film above. It contains references to 26 different movies. How many can you identify? Name their titles and be entered into a prize draw to win all 26 on DVD. Need help? See what others are saying here

Guardian open platform at W+K

David Fisher and Matt Gilbert of The Guardian visited Wieden + Kennedy today to talk about Open Platform, which makes Guardian content and resources available to developers to allow them to create tools and applications.

David Fisher and Matt Gilbert of The Guardian visited Wieden + Kennedy today to talk about Open Platform, which makes Guardian content and resources available to developers to allow them to create tools and applications.

David and matt

David Fisher (Head of Brand Partnerships) and Matt Gilbert (Head of Business Development) of The Guardian visited Wieden + Kennedy today to talk about Open Platform, which makes Guardian content and resources available to developers to allow them to create tools and applications. It's a fascinating initiative that aligns commercial strategy with editorial vision. While competitors are putting up walls, The Guardian is opening its doors. As editor Alan Rusbridger said in his Hugh Cudlipp Lecture:

Many of the Guardian's most interesting experiments at the moment lie
in this area of combining what we know, or believe, or think, or have
found out, with the experience, range, opinions, expertise and passions
of the people who read us, or visit us or want to participate rather
than passively receive.

So, watch this space for news of tools and apps developed by Wieden + Kennedy using Guardian content, for ourselves and for our clients.