On set with Honda in Kiev

We've already blogged about out latest work for Honda but please indulge us as we share some imagery from the making of 'Ignition'. 

Our team had an unforgettable experience working with our friends at Honda. 

We set up home in the Ukraine for a fortnight, shooting on the Podolsko-Voskresenskiy bridge in Kiev. 

These shots, captured by our very own Honda GAD, Nick Owen, depict the action from 'behind the scenes'.

насолоджуйтеся!

 

The bridge of dreams:

Road

Jenson looks focused as he prepares for lift off:

Jenson

Soichiro Honda’s famous quote emblazoned on a helmet – ‘Without racing there is no Honda’:

Sochiro

Anti-gravity effect to the max: 

Prep

We built a custom studio on the bridge to shoot each night:

Night

Scott, James, Nick and ASIMO relax between shots:

4 guys

We teamed up with Somesuch and Radioaktive to produce the spot, directed by the lovely Aoife McArdle:

Board

And here are some portraits from the shoot… 

Portrait-AKowalski

Portrait-JKowalski

 

Face

Other face

 

 

NSFWK – Welcome to the Internet

A picture of the Internet
as drawn by Bushra Hasan from Community Middle School (Can You Draw the
Internet?)

The Internet is pretty
big. Bigger than most things in fact (sort of) and there’s an awful lot of
really interesting stuff going on all the time that people should probably know
about. That’s why, fresh from hearing “Have you seen this…” or “OMG I can’t
believe that video where…” far too
often, the team at NSFWK have
decided to compile a weekly trend report on what’s going on in the palatial thingamajig
that is the World Wide Web.

Every week we’ll take a
snapshot of the UK’s most popular videos, top search results, most shared
images, most used hashtags, and most popular new apps. It’s focused mainly on things that have originated and been made specifically
for the web. There will be branded stuff on there, but not just TV ads that
have had loads of media wanged behind them; that's not really in the spirit of
the whole thing.

Trend_report_121121

You can download the report (with links) here - Welcome to the Internet – 21/11

We’ll also be accompanying it with some
comment and context to set it all in place. Well, we wouldn’t let you get off
lightly, would we?

This week has a couple of talking points,
firstly the popularity and success of ‘Fenton 4GEE remaster’, a video created
by EE to educate people on the how fast their 4G network is. What we commend is
the fact that EE references the source of the original content, something
countless other ads haven’t done in the past. All too often content, ideas, and
premises are ‘borrowed’ from online without ever referencing back and
acknowledging the source. Whilst EE benefits from referencing, as the creative
doesn’t really work without it, let’s hope that this habit continues and puts
to rest lazy creative types stealing things from online.

The second point is something that we’ve been
noticing for a while and anybody with half an eye on Twitter’s trending topics
will have no doubt spotted as well: the top trending topics from week to week
are totally dominated by prompts and discussions around TV shows, showing the
dominance of second screening in today’s front rooms – apparently a nearly
quarter of us are doing it (Deloitte, 2012). But it’s not just the programmes…
With people primed and ready to comment on what they see, it’s never been
more important to make sure that people have something to say about your ad. And
that doesn’t just mean throwing a hashtag on the end frame. As we like to say,
“Move me, dude”.

That’s that for this week. We’ll be back next
week with no doubt more animal videos and people being stupid. If you have any
comments we’d love to know.

keith richards – the advertising years

I’ve been reading Keith Richards’ autobiography ‘Life’. I was intrigued to learn that, before he became the drug-hoovering outlaw superstar we know and love, Keith considered a career in advertising.

I’ve been reading Keith Richards’ autobiography ‘Life’. I was intrigued to learn that, before he became the drug-hoovering outlaw superstar we know and love, Keith considered a career in advertising.

Keith
Keith Richards in 1963. Taking a break from drawing up Gilbey's Gin scamps for his portfolio.

I've been reading Keith Richards' autobiography 'Life'. I'm only up to about 1967 so far but I would recommend it to anyone with even a passing interest in rock'n'roll. It's an extraordinary tale, engagingly told. I was intrigued to learn that, before he became the drug-hoovering outlaw superstar we know and love, Keith considered a career in advertising.Thought I would share the details here.

Keith was expelled from school and started at Sidcup Art College in 1959. "The society and everything I was growing up in was just too small for me…I knew I had to look for a way out…"

Here are a couple of brief extracts from 'Life' about his brushes with the Industry of Ad:

"There was almost no 'art' to be had at Sidcup. After a while you got a drift of what you were being trained for and it wasn't Leonardo da Vinci. Loads of flash little sons of bitches would come down in their bow ties from J. Walter Thompson or one of the other big advertisers for one day a week to take the piss out of the art school students and try and pick up the chicks. They'd lord it over us and you got taught how to advertise…I realise now we were getting some dilapidated tail end of a noble art-teaching tradition from the pre-war period… all thrown away on advertising Gilbey's Gin.

"At the end (of art school) your teacher says, 'Well I think this is pretty good.' and they send you off to J. Walter Thompson and you have an appointment, and by then, in a way you know what's coming – three or four smarty-pants, with the usual bow ties. 'Keith, is it? Nice to see you. Show us what you've got.' And you lay the old folder out. 'Hmmmm. I say, we've had a good look at this, Keith, and it does show some promise. By the way, do you make a good cup of tea?' I said yes, but not for you. I walked off with my folio – it was green, I remember – and I dumped it in the garbage can when I got downstairs. That was my final attempt to join society on their terms…I didn't have the patience or facility to be a hack in an advertising agency."

So, it appears that we can thank the bow-tied 'flash sons of bitches' at JWT for the long and illustrious career of The Rolling Stones. Just imagine if the interview had gone differently and Keef had joined JWT Sidcup, partnered up with Sir Martin Sorrell instead of Mick and was now Chief Creative Officer of JWT.

Keithrichards-vuitton

Keef didn't entirely turn his back on advertising; he appeared a few years ago in the campaign above for Louis Vuitton. Nice guitar, sir.

But, luckily, instead of making the tea at JWT, he made stuff like this:

Wieden + Kennedy named agency of the year 2010 by Ad Age & Creativity

Wieden + Kennedy has been named Agency of the Year by key US trade mags Advertising Age and Creativity.

Screen shot 2011-01-25 at 08.17.24
"For the first time, Ad Age and Creativity are honoring the same top shop. And for good reason. When it came to bold idea-making and strong execution, nobody did it like this Portland, Ore.-based stalwart. Couple that with its newfound mettle in building strong client bonds and it won the business case, too."

Screen shot 2011-01-25 at 08.17.47
Creativity said:

"Creativity considers all agency types in its agency of the year selection process — digital, full service and everything in between — so only one top agency emerges from that multidisciplinary pile. But no agency can win without demonstrating a "digital" mindset in its work, and an overall fitness to thrive in a digital world. Wieden simply represented the best all-round agency, one that happened to distinguish itself by having the best digital campaign of the year."

These latest accolades come on top of what was a pretty amazing 2010 for W+K in terms of Agency and Campaign of the Year-type things. There's no way to list this stuff without sounding like a bunch of smug gits, but here goes:

– Campaign Network of the Year 2010 

– Adweek Agency of the Year 2010

– Advertising Age agency of the Year 2010 

– Creativity Agency of the Year 2010 

– SHOOT magazine Agency of the Year 2010

– Ranked by clients as UK’s #1 digital agency (Pitch / YouGov survey)

– Ranked by strategic planners as world’s #1 (equal) for planning

– Five out of the year’s top ten most-watched brand virals on YouTube

– Nike Write the Future named Campaign’s Campaign of the Year

– Three Grands Prix at Cannes Festival

– Top prize at Campaign Big Awards for Nike

– Top prize at Epica Europe Awards for Nokia

– Top Prize at One Show Interactive for Nike

Phew.

Creativity quotes founder Dan Wieden as follows:

"In any company you go through a period of thinking, this is not like the good old days," Mr. Wieden said. "Well, the good old days were never as good as this last year."

Screen shot 2011-01-25 at 08.21.24


department of advertising correction in the area

Ad correction van

Saw this van across the road from the office the other day. Hoped it was a new special task force empowered to stamp out punctuation errors in communications and signage in the east London area.

Ad correction cu
But no. Apparently what they are doing is modifying conservative party election posters to whimsical and poetic ends like this:

Picture 8

Picture 12
Intriguing. And far more arresting and thought-provoking than any of the official communications from any of the main political parties.

is advertising on twitter right for your business?

Twitter just announced that they will be launching a new ad platform and you may be wondering if it’s right for your business. This is a point of view from the Wieden + Kennedy digital strategy team.

Twitter just announced that they will be launching a new ad platform and you may be wondering if it’s right for your business. This is a point of view from the Wieden + Kennedy digital strategy team.

A point of view from the W+K strategy team.

Twitter just announced that they will be launching a new ad platform and you may be wondering if it’s right for your business.  Before we get to that, first let’s talk about how the new model works.

First and foremost, Twitter’s system isn’t all that different from Google AdWords, which is a system for placing ads alongside search results based on the keywords the searcher used.  Twitter advertisers place CPL (cost-per-thousand views) bids on keywords and their tweets are displayed in the search results based on their bid and quality score, which will likely be calculated based on how people respond to the tweet, i.e. retweets, @replies generated by the tweet and new followers.  The higher your quality score, the lower your CPM.

The benefit to advertisers according to Twitter is your tweets will be displayed “above the noise” of ever-changing search results, which gives brands the power to respond to discussions in real-time and not be buried by rapidly changing Twitter search results.  Eventually, promoted tweets will find their way into Twitter streams and desktop/mobile Twitter clients like TweetDeck and Tweetie, but Twitter has not yet announced how this will be executed, but it will likely be related to the topics users tweet about.  The ads will initially look like this:

Picture 2 
Now, are sponsored tweets right for your business?  If you have something to say that’s relevant in real-time, then yes.  If you want to use it to promote a static message the same way you would with Google AdWords or banners, sponsored tweets are probably not right for you.

The Starbucks example above is a great illustration of an effective use of this technology.  It’s related to a one-day promotion and would be shown to users expressing interest in the brand.  It would also make sense for them to use more general keywords relating to coffee.  However, keywords relating to free stuff and deals would attract less qualified users.

Initally, this system is being tested by Starbucks, Virgin America and Bravo, however, it will soon be opened up to other brands. 

 

Honda ‘campaign of the decade’ reel by wieden + kennedy

Here’s an edit we made to celebrate the recent naming of our work for Honda over the last few years as ‘campaign of the decade’ by Campaign magazine.

Here’s an edit we made to celebrate the recent naming of our work for Honda over the last few years as ‘campaign of the decade’ by Campaign magazine.

Here’s an edit we made to celebrate the recent naming of our work for Honda over the last few years as ‘campaign of the decade’ by Campaign magazine.They said ‘With a consistent combination of industry-defining, award-winning and brand-building ads, Wieden + Kennedy’s work for Honda took top spot.’

new (?) ad agency news aggregator: agencyrecord

Picture 2

This site agency record is new to me. Which may mean it's been around for ages. Anyway, at the risk of seeming hugely out of touch, I'll draw your attention to it as it seems like it may be useful for anyone working in this business.

Here's how it describes itself:

Agency Record was created out of a necessity. Spend enough time in
advertising and you learn it's always best to keep an eye on everyone
else – creatively and from a business standpoint. We never had one
source for this, one place that just sort of kept an up-to-date record
of the agencies and what they are up to.

So we made one.

Picture 1

Most
content is syndicated to the site by dynamic crawlers that glean all
the best info from the most relevant sources. Additionally, we crawl
the twitter space, dynamically following the currently most relevant
twitterati in advertising. All this information is broken up into a few
segments – News and Agency.

News is news from all the best sources, syndicated here. Plus our own featured articles now and again.

Agency is the syndicated voices of all the players making the most noise.

Picture 3

Planned Additions:

Galleries of the best and most current work.
Interviews
Job boards

We hope you enjoy this, share it and use it.

Haven't had much time to explore it yet but it looks interesting. So, here I am sharing it.

why let drink decide?

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy for the DSFC aims to raise awareness of how alcohol can make young people vulnerable.

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy for the DSFC aims to raise awareness of how alcohol can make young people vulnerable.

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy is our first work with the Department of Schools, Families and Children. The campaign aims to raise awareness of how alcohol
can make young people vulnerable. It’s not only the drink itself that puts young people at risk, it’s the decisions they make when under the influence of drink. The advertisements ask young people
and their parents ‘Why Let Drink Decide?’ and aim to help parents work
with their children to establish a safe and sensible relationship with
alcohol.
The ad below is
aimed at parents;  there
is a cinema ad targeting young people that comes out shortly.

More info at http://whyletdrinkdecide.direct.gov.uk/