why let drink decide?

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy for the DSFC aims to raise awareness of how alcohol can make young people vulnerable.

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy for the DSFC aims to raise awareness of how alcohol can make young people vulnerable.

This new national campaign from Wieden + Kennedy is our first work with the Department of Schools, Families and Children. The campaign aims to raise awareness of how alcohol
can make young people vulnerable. It’s not only the drink itself that puts young people at risk, it’s the decisions they make when under the influence of drink. The advertisements ask young people
and their parents ‘Why Let Drink Decide?’ and aim to help parents work
with their children to establish a safe and sensible relationship with
alcohol.
The ad below is
aimed at parents;  there
is a cinema ad targeting young people that comes out shortly.

More info at http://whyletdrinkdecide.direct.gov.uk/

6 thoughts on “why let drink decide?”

  1. “The advertisements ask young people and their parents ‘Why Let Drink Decide?’ and aim to help parents work with their children to establish a safe and sensible relationship with alcohol. The ad below is aimed at parents”

    sorry – im not quite getting how all this comes across in the ad? to me it looks like you’re using the theory that drugs are linked with drink… do any of you remember being young? surely if the kid knows something is wrong, then they are making that choice themselves and will hopefully learn from it – isnt this life? if an adult says not to do something, the kid will be more likely to rebel right?

    this advert is fear-mongering and is telling people that they dont already ‘control’ kids enough.

    what positive effect can this advert have on anyone?

  2. David – the ad is intended to convey the message that if kids are under the influence of alcohol, they may be more likely to make decisions that put them at risk. The whole point is that they may not ‘know something is wrong’ when their judgement is impaired by alcohol; this may limit their ability to make the choice to which you refer. So the campaign suggests that parents should talk to their children about alcohol at an age before they are at risk, when they still seek parental guidance. You seem to be suggesting that we follow the approach of allowing children to burn themselves so they learn that the fire is hot.

  3. “to me it looks like you’re using the theory that drugs are linked with drink…”

    Among 15 year olds who first drank at 10 years old or younger, 17% have taken class A drugs by the age of 14.

    That’s hardly a theory that drugs are linked with drink.

  4. Dave – if that’s your theory, the question is – what percentage of 15 year olds who had NOT drunk alcohol by ten years old or younger went on to take class A drugs by age 14? Was it greater or less than 17%? Of course, if it is less than 17%, this would show a correlation but not necessarily a causal connection between childhood alcohol comsumption and subsequent drug use.
    However, the campaign does not seek to suggest that alcohol is always a stepping stone to other forms of drug abuse. Merely that, when under influence of alcohol, young people may make unwise choices in relation to potentially risky behaviour. Choices that they might not make when sober.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *